Suiko

Suiko

In a world enamored with all things technology, aimed to gear the universe into a digitized state, live many artists and innovators. This world, better known as Japan is the host of artists who have recreated American art and brought their cultural creativity across boarders to be accepted by art fans in almost every country. Among them is Suiko, an artist who veered away from gadgets and cultural art in search of fulfilling his pipe dreams of becoming a graffiti artist. Despite growing up in the fast paced city known for fast cars and flashing lights, Suiko describes Hiroshima through his eyes, “it’s not special,” as anyone would say who is accustomed to hometown excitement. Hiroshima, Japan may have not been a dream for Suiko but he held a visual within himself that he wanted to live out. “Daring to say, my father is an author of picture books.” While his father was creating the smaller pictures, Suiko had intentions of doing something bigger.

Suiko

Suiko didn’t grow up in an environment where he was surrounded with inspiration for his current art obsession. “The local Hiroshima area it didn’t have a mature graffiti culture when I entered upon the graffiti world.” Unlike a child forced into one of the many demanding fields of fine arts, Suiko dared to dream with the independence that he was granted. “When [I was] a high school student, a teacher of mine taught me that ‘Expression is freedom.’ So I kept drawing up to now.”

After high school he decided to take up art on more of a sophisticated level. “I belonged to a University of Art for about six years. I did not study drawing so much; however I learned an idea and various methodologies to express it there.” Even though he discovered his love for art before he began higher education, it wasn’t until he actually attended a university that he found an interest in various art forms, “I did 3D and design too.”

Suiko

In 2002 while traveling to Germany, he was exposed to art that had not previously been taught inside of the walls of any classroom that he sat in. It was then and there that he began to get recognition for that art that he learned to perfect back in Japan. “I felt [a] considerable response around 2003, because I was able to absorb a lot of things in Germany.” The year 2003 was significant not only because Suiko had risen upon a new horizon upon his return from Germany; it was also the year that he created his first mural that measured 5 meters X 40 meters. “The graffiti mural [was] so big that my friend helped to paint it.” Suiko also says that this work of art is one that he is most proud of. “[The] huge mural that I produced with my crew and MOTEL in Hiroshima is my honor. I have a special feeling for it because I planned the mural.”

Suiko

Influenced by traditional Japanese art and techniques Suiko is sometimes confused by others’ conceptions. “I think [it’s an] exaggerated response rather than the misunderstanding. I feel rash though I hear that foreign people say ‘cool’ about uncommonness of Japanese art. [Everything] is not always good stuff.” As of now Suiko is focused on his mural works. He is appreciative of the environment and enjoys what he calls wild-crafting. “I am very happy that we are able to eat what grows on mountains and so on.”

Regardless of how people perceive Japanese art right now, Suiko has plans for Hiroshima’s future. “I am eager to change my town [into a] mural city. I want artists beyond graffiti writers to come and play here.” Even though he’s been around the globe, he still wants to share his art in another special part of the world. “Though I went to Germany, Italy, Czech Republic, Britain and South Korea, I would like to go to Spain.” If his intentions of painting the town with graffiti instead of the color red go through, he could possibly stray thoughts of Hiroshima from the atomic bomb to an artsy explosion.

Makula Dunbar
Hey Everyone!As my name displays I'm Makula Dunbar. I am a person who loves music, fashion, Hip-Hop culture and everything in between. I love to write, and I am very happy to be contributing to the Format movement.
Makula Dunbar

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