Peter Rosenberg

Peter Rosenburg

His affinity for both hip-hop and wrestling is something of a conundrum – what one man could love the true aesthetics of hip-hop and the melodramatic theatrics of professional wrestling? Easy, Peter Rosenberg. The radio veteran’s colloquial pedigree is exhaustive – having interviewed the likes of ?uestlove, Raekwon and 50 Cent, Rosenberg has cemented his spot in the hip-hop community with his off-the top yet provocative approach.

Rosenberg currently calls New York City’s famed HOT 97 home where he hosts the “Real Late with Peter Rosenberg” show every Sunday. He’s also something of a satirist – his web videos “This is Why Duke Sucks” and “Throw Some Cheese On It” had Internet fruit flies hungry for more of “the real.” Like Radio Raheem to Bed-Stuy, Peter Rosenberg is New York City’s voice of the streets.

“I’ve had some interviews with porn stars where I’ve learned some interesting stuff and gotten some interesting offers”

Format: How did you get your start in radio?
Rosenberg: Like everyone else – college radio. I did a show for years at WMUC in College Park, Maryland and just worked my way up.

Format: You’ve interviewed a variety of hip-hop artists, ranging from 50 Cent to Little Brother to Ghostface Killah. What’s your most memorable moment?
Rosenberg: Probably that second 50 [Cent] interview – the one on YouTube. I wasn’t prepared and it was my worst interview, but probably the one that the most people saw. It was a great learning experience.

Format: Conversely, what’s the weirdest thing someone has shared with you off radio?
Rosenberg: Weird? I mean no rapper has ever tried to get in my pants or anything. I’ve had some interviews with porn stars where I’ve learned some interesting stuff and gotten some interesting offers, but nothing crazy from rappers.

Format: How is this experience at HOT 97 different from working in D.C. or at XM Satellite Radio?
Rosenberg: Being at the biggest hip-hop station in the world is unlike being anywhere else. The magnifying glass is huge, as is the power and responsibility. It’s a lot of fun, but it comes with some pressure.

Format: How do you try to make your show different from other hip hop-focused radio broadcasts?
Rosenberg: I just do me. I play the music that touches me and I run the show that I have always ran since I was pretending to do radio shows in my room as a kid. The show is completely pure.

Format: To what extent do you believe radio is a dying medium?
Rosenberg: To no extent. Radio as we knew it may be dying, but as far as being a medium that has a ton of influence and plays a huge role in people’s lives – it will always be there. People get something different from radio, [whether] satellite or terrestrial, than they do from their iPods.

“It was hands down the best of the Jay-Z remix projects, no diss to Danger Mouse who is ill, but The Grey Album doesn’t hold a candle to Kev’s when it comes to pure listening value.”

Format: You executive produced one of many Jay-Z remix albums, The Brown Album – a project that people said you take credit for “coming up with.” What’s the story behind that?
Rosenberg: [Laughs] Umm – I came up with it. I called Kev and said, “Hey I got these acapellas, we’re doing The Brown Album.” He resisted at first, but we convinced him to do it and it turned out to be a classic. It was hands down the best of the Jay-Z remix projects, no diss to Danger Mouse who is ill, but The Grey Album doesn’t hold a candle to Kev’s when it comes to pure listening value.

Format: Do you have anything in the works now?
Rosenberg: Oh I have a lot in the works, including The Low Budget Album, a few mixtapes, a lot more web content, and hopefully new radio shows.

Format: Aside from rappers, you’ve interviewed a healthy mix of wrestlers as well, from Bret Hart to Booker T. What was that like?
Rosenberg: Wrestling is an art that I care deeply about and that brings me a ton of joy so interviewing the best ever like Bret Hart and Ric Flair is an honor. Booker and his wife, Sharmell, were incredibly cool and fun to talk to. I love interviewing wrestlers and it will always be a big part of my personality and my life.

Format: If you were a wrestler who would you be?
Rosenberg: That’s such a tough question. I have to say in terms of wrestling ability, personality, and money making, it doesn’t get much better than “Stone Cold” Steve Austin. That guy was an absolute monster. From his music, to his matches, to the stunner – the guy was just so exciting.

Format: When your career is over, how do you want to be remembered?
Rosenberg: As someone who never compromised himself. I want people to say: “That dude did exactly what he wanted to and he made it work and people loved it.” Or I’d settle for, “How did that fat fuck always have such a hot girl on his arm?”

More Info: http://www.rosenbergradio.com/

“Being at the biggest hip-hop station in the world is unlike being anywhere else. The magnifying glass is huge, as is the power and responsibility.”

Jason Parham

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6 comments

  1. When I first saw the Pharoahe Monch interview he did, I absolutely hated this guy for weeks. Since then though, he has come off as a funny ass dude & I wish him the best.

  2. Gotmymindwright says:

    The inspiring part was about hearing how he used pretend to do radio shows in his room when he was a little kid…damn talk about following your dream and making it happen… hats off to you my dude

  3. I’m never up for his Late show…I catch a chuck of the Juan Epsteins…but I make sure if I got some downtime I stream them from his site…best listen in radio…Hands Down…Brings it back to the Stretch and Bobitto shows, old future flavors, even some Battle of the Beats that Hot 97 used to do…

  4. > His affinity for both hip-hop and wrestling is something of a conundrum…

    How so?? Hip Hop is as fake and soap opera-ish, if not more so than pro wrestling nowadays.

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